Tag Archive | "Success"

Model Watch: Nyasha Matonhodze


model profile

At 16 most girls only dream of being a super model, but for Nyasha Matohondze it’s a reality. It’s barely been two years since she entered the fashion industry but she’s already done stuff that many fail to accomplish in their entire modelling careers.

Nyasha was born in Zimbabwe and moved to London in 2003 to stay with her mother. Her career began in 2009 when she became a finalist at the Elite model look. She rose to fame in 2011 when she was chosen as the face of Louis Vuitton’s autumn/winter 2011 campaign in a lucrative contract deal that would later turn her into a success story.

Nyasha has walked the runway in various fashion weeks for several brands that include Louis Vuitton, Louis Gray, Marc Jacobs and Michael Kors to name a few. In 2011 alone she walked a total of 67 shows in New York, London, Milan and Paris; 47 for the spring 2012 season and 20 for the fall. She has also appeared in editorials of some of the most esteemed magazines in the world like Teen Vogue, Harpers Bazaar, W and Numero. Barely a week into the New Year Versace announced that Nyasha was their face of the brand’s pre-fall 2012 campaign.

From where l am standing, Nyasha’s future looks very bright. This goes to show that it doesn’t matter where you come from, your star will shine if you have the talent…well, in this case, the looks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Innocent Ndlovu
Twitter: @IamInnocentn
Blog: studioinn.tumblr.com

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Phakamis’ iFlag: Trevor Noah on Jay Leno’s Show


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Dream the dream that scares you the most


As a new year dawns upon us, it is often quite natural and appropriate to look back on the year that was and to think a little bit philosophically. As I look back and reminisce over the past year whilst planning for what is appropriately titled 20-self or the capitalists version being 20-wealth, I am astounded at what I have achieved in a mere twelve months. I am truly grateful for the opportunities to have engaged with bright young minds on various projects, travelled internationally, networked with highly influential and powerful people whilst focusing on my studies and more importantly, working towards my ultimate dream of running the world!

However, I sit and wonder if these dreams or goals have been big enough, or were they sometimes too realistic and easily achievable? I sometimes wonder if we have a predisposition to limit ourselves, our mindsets, our thoughts and even our dreams to that which we can achieve and make a reality. Are we so inclined to dream with limitation that we fail to dream the dream that scares us the most; the dream that causes you to have sleepless nights? The dream that makes you so uncomfortable and the thought of realizing it causes so many mixed emotions internally with fear, doubt, uncertainty, anxiety and apprehension pulling in one direction, and excitement, enthusiasm, joy, passion and exhilaration pulling in the other? Furthermore, are we a generation with low expectations of ourselves and what we can possibly achieve? Have we become so acclimatised to the notion of dreaming only that which is possible and attainable, rather than what is beyond our wildest imagination?

Lowell Lundstrum famously said that, “If your dreams don’t scare you, they aren’t big enough.” As I ponder on this statement, I realize that only if a dream is large enough will it make us get out of our comfort zones and fuel the fire and burning desire within us to achieve it, as a large dream involves more risk and requires more effort and persistence than a dream which is easily attainable. This sentiment can be examined through an analysis of the greatest inventors of time such as Thomas Edison, the Wright Brothers, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs, whom through the extraordinary dreams revolutionized the world. Locally, we can look at the likes of Mark Shuttleworth, Patrice Motsepe, Wendy Luhabe and Khanyi Dhlomo for inspiration.

Our former President Nelson Mandela is probably the best example of an individual whose dream was so large that once it was realized it unified a nation, and today we can all be proud to be South Africans and celebrate our freedom, heritage and democracy with pride – all thanks to one man who had a great dream for our beautiful country. In that regard, I challenge you to dream the dream that scares you the most and take the responsibility in making your dreams a reality. As Sarah Ban Breathnach states, “The world needs dreamers and the world needs doers. But above all, the world needs dreamers who do.”

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The Dream Deferred


Growing up, I was told that we live in a world of infinite possibilities; a world where if you wanted something badly enough, the universe would conspire in your favour just to help you achieve a part of your destiny. That philosophy has been at the forefront of turning my dreams into reality.

I remember when I was still doing my honours degree at university, I had huge dreams of being the next CEO of a multinational company (which I’d have started from scratch myself, of course), winning a Nobel Laureate Prize, starting my own entrepreneurship academy whilst gracing the cover of Forbes magazine. My dreams were as big as my imagination could allow me to dream, and it was not so much about the dreams themselves being so extraordinary, it was that feeling within me that passionately knew I could achieve all of these dreams and more that fuelled my burning desire to succeed.

Funny how a thing called “life” just seems to happen and gets in the way of one accomplishing those dreams. What happens to the dream deferred? Will dreams always remain that, just dreams? Is it so simple to just totally disregard our dreams because our current circumstances and situations may not allow them to happen? When reality comes with all its challenges, rollercoaster rides and when the lows seem to endure much longer than the highs, it becomes so easy to just pack your dreams neatly away “until further notice.” Looking at myself today being a young, dynamic and ambitious woman, filled with so much potential and having achieved so much in my 23 years of existence, I wonder what really happened to those dreams. Not wanting to sound ungrateful for the opportunities life has afforded me, I just want to ensure that when my time on this earth comes to an end; I have used up every inch of my potential.

I was once told that the biggest challenge of achieving any goal is starting, and finally it clicked that ultimately all success lies in action and execution. If your life is simply a reflection of your actions, would you want to risk living a life of inaction? The logic behind it seems so simple, however, there is one debilitating emotion that always works to your disadvantage, and that’s the fear of failure. However, a great attitude and the desire and determination to realise your dream will overcome any obstacles that attempt to hinder your success. Following your dream is not easy, and may require you to sacrifice your time, talents and money, but the thought of never realising your dreams because of negative thoughts such as fear, will be the ultimate sacrifice you will pay as you will never really know what you are truly capable of.

You may still be wondering, what happens to the dream deferred? You are the only one to determine that answer, but as you think of simply stacking one of your dreams away, remember these words by John Kehoe, “Your success helps others. Your failure helps no one. Don’t be selfish. Succeed.”

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Forbes Africa: And the Launch Cover Feature is…?


forbes africa

So I’m a little disappointed. Every so often the stars align and give us an opportunity to shine. Such an opportunity presented itself this past week when Forbes Africa was launched. A while back I wrote a piece speculating on who would be the lucky bugger to grace the cover of the mag. I was hoping for some innovation. I was hoping the magazine would grab this opportunity to tell us something we don’t know and show us a face we had not seen. They chose to not do that. Guess who they put on the cover? South Africans will no doubt get this right.

Before I get labelled as a jealous hater, let it be known that I am avid admirer of the man. He is undoubtedly The Man. I have nothing but bucket loads of applause for him. It is always a pleasure to hear of his success, even though no matter how much I read about his ever-increasing mountain of millions my bank balance remains the same. I wish just reading about rich people made their wealth rub off on you.

Patrice Motsepe “Africa’s Man of Mettle” stands tall and proud on the cover, the definition of power. I’m guessing the logic is if they put some unknown face on the cover we’ll just walk right past it. Patrice has a pull effect the magazine wanted to take advantage of. I feel like a child. Remember those moments when your parents were right and that annoyed you to no end. They’re right; I can’t eat that much pudding, but eish I still want the stuff. The editors are right, Patrice is the perfect man for the first cover, but Read the full story

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I Am Success


Where is the evidence of a broke down spirit? I’m not torn inside, where did you get that? Who said that? Shut up! I’m in top form, playing my A game. Living it up large, I’m in the hottest city, scratching my way up to get my piece of the riches. We are in the city of bright lights and gold after all. And I’m not going to stop there. Let’s create a bit of drama. Find me a few thousand Twitter followers so I can be included in the celebrity culture. Get me a big pair of shades, shiny bling as well, silver and gold, to reflect my success to all that look at me. Of course this is my heart’s desire! Look at me, look at my face, don’t you see that smile? It oozes with charm and grace – I am the South African dream, my name is Success Baby!

Even if it sways backwards and forth, neither here nor there, for now it’s the only certainty I can hold onto. The turbulence will eventually ease down, and some multi-billion corporate will find my façade worthy of being the face of their brand. This face will call in the numbers. People want to know what I think about things, what is trendy, what is cool, who should they listen to? Read the full story

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2 Minutes with Aldecia Molaudzi


Other than the glitz and glamour that come with being a top model, there’s also hard work that meets someone who aims at doing more than just walking on a ramp in designer wear.  24 year old Tzaneen-born Aldecia Molaudzi, the managing director of Sethabisa sa Borwa, also known as 2SAB, a modelling and casting agency is proof that it is through passion regardless of the industry you are in, that guarantees success.

Molaudzi, a voice over artist, motivational speaker, business woman and actress in her own right, has worked her way towards making a name for herself. I asked her just a few questions on who she is, what she does and why she does it:

Being in the media/ entertainment industry is hard enough, now being an agent is even harder! What makes what you do so difficult?

People expect me to make their dreams come true in the industry. I wish they would understand that being an agent means I am only a vessel and that their “big break” depends entirely on either the director or producer of the show. It’s hard seeing someone join my agency but not find work or knowing that I have failed someone.

What’s the one thing you wish you’d known before you got into the industry?

This industry can be so fake and at times so lonely! You need to know who your true friends are out there.

10 years from now what would you like to have achieved for yourself?

I would like to be a brand. I want to have built an empire and be the greatest I can be. My purpose here on earth is to make a difference because it is what I am called for, and I haven’t yet achieved that. I want to touch and change lives through 2SAB Models and also through the foundation I am currently busy with that seeks to empower young people.

What has been the highlight of your career thus far?

The biggest break to date for 2SAB Models has definitely been casting Ntombi’s  baby on Generations. Also, being an MC at the BMF Women’s Awards in 2009 in Polokwane, and working closely with SA’s top musicians like Big Nuz, Slikour, HHP, to name just a few. I’ve recently landed one of my models a huge contract with Mr. Price, which is a huge achievement for us.

Are you living your dreams and are you content?

Yes! I am in the journey, this is my dream and this is what I wanted, and I still want more. My job makes me happy and it doesn’t even feel like I’m working because I genuinely love what I do.

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#Women’s Month Series: Tumelo Mothotoane


Being Women’s Month, I wanted to find a few women from different walks of life all pushing their dreams towards their journey in finding their own fulfilment. I wanted to find out just who they are when they aren’t behind or on camera. I needed to know each of their stories with an emotional and feminine touch to it.

Meet…

Tumelo Mothotoane, a second year media and psychology student at Wits University. After waiting for months to meet with her, I finally got the chance out of her busy life to get just a peak into who this twenty year old woman is. She is a media and marketing manager, MC and forms part of the Miss Soweto judging panel. She’s also a blogger and current affairs journalist on campus. Her most famous role is her presenting job on one of Soweto TV’s most popular show SISTAS a young women’s talk show that draws inspiration, advice and education from young women living in Mzansi.

I asked her 5 questions on Read the full story

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