Archive | Ezasekasi

Sabelo Mthembu -The next big thang to hit the music world!

Unfortunately due to the rapid pace life seems to travel at, I never have time to ever listen to music, but when I do get time it has to be have been worth that precious minute. So because I never have time for things like fun or social activities I was invited/forced to a performance by a good friend of mine and the opening act was a young man who for once in my life made me shut up and give him my undivided attention the minute he opened his mouth to sing.

SabeloThere is just something about Sabelo Mthembu’s voice that has me believing and knowing for a fact that this young man will become the next big thing to hit SA’s music scene in 2013.

His voice is husky yet also like silk. Rough and rugged, but also perfectly smooth and pure.  I’m so happy that when he gets nominated at the SAMA’s  or Metro’s this year in the Best New Comer category I will be one of those people who will sit back from my couch and say “Kasi Times told you so”. His music speaks to the heart in that he sings about love, life and brotherly affection in a cheerful yet soulful manner with a sprinkle of quality jazz elements in it. Rare for someone his age. I’m no Simon Cowell or Randal Abrahams but “Songs of Brotherhood” is an album I would buy any day and rock in my car, phone, ipod, stereo or hi-fi.

sabs3

The former SA idols contestant sings about things I can relate to, things I aspire to feel and his beats are simply …beautiful. I love each and every track because I can tell he did not rush himself in creating songs like “Ungumfowetu”, “Phola nhliziyo” or “Ofana nawe” which by the way is the title track to Thami Ngubeni’s SABC talk show “Life with Thami”. I can tell through tracks like “Dreaming in Cairo” that this brother is serious about his talent. I am a sucker for anything related to love so the song “Angiphili mawungekho” is my favourite/national anthem.

 

_JCA1930 copyHe sings both in vernac and English and has a voice so unique you would have to hear it for yourself in order to get what I am going on about. But if I would try to compare his vocal quality to anyone famous I would drop names like Anthony Hamilton, John Legend and Lemar except the difference is that he is unique in that he does it in a proudly Mzansi way. “Songs of brotherhood” drops at the end of February 2013. It’s a must have.

View his profile on www.sabelomthembu.com

Download his single on  http://soundcloud.com/sabelo-siphelele-mthembu/ofana-nawe.

Blessings

Poppy Pops Vilakazi

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Ispan’ -The artist

With so many opportunities available for the youth, some do no budge to the idea of a nine to five job. Most believe that they aren’t cut for the an office, suits and a ties. Hence they use their talents to make ends meet. Ausiki Podi, raised in Motetema in Mpumalanga is one of those who don’t believe in having a boss. She is a self proclaimed artist, she runs Ausiki Art.

The Beginning
Her love for art was unleashed through fashion design while she was still in high school. “I was not a normal dresser, I designed my own school uniform and many people used to tell me that I should consider art,” she said.
This is where her journey begin. Her dream was to be a jewellery designer because she had a passion about bead work and African artwork. She later went to register in Sedibeng college, in Sebokeng, for graphic design. The course came with the whole package of art, from sculpturing, designing painting and everything in art. In 2005, made her first painting and since then she has never looked back.

Wishes vs Passion
“A nine to five job has never been in my plans, the thought of not having money at the end of the month scared me. Apart from the money, Art is about the freedom of expression, working a nine to five would not give me that,” she said.

Highlights
In 2008 she launched Ausiki Art and Design (artists of the north exhibition), 2009 my first magazine interview, 2009 my project with the – Department of Arts and Culture (DAC)on Heritage day in Moroke Village, 2010 lecturing Art and Design at the Dynamic Skills and Development College of South Africa (DSDC), 2010 my interview with Pasella on SABC 2, 2011 Exhibition at the South African State Theatre, 2012 Exhibiting at the Rand Easter Show.

My Love for Art
Art (painting, drawing, graphics, sculpturing etc) is my life, it is who I am, what I know and what I love. Art is my way of life.

My Inspiration
I’m inspired by the living, being South African, being female, my family, my surroundings, nature, pain, joy and life in general.

Challenges
Being fully depended on Art, Graphics and freelancing means one is expected to work twice as hard compared to a person earning a salary at the end of the month.

Benefits
The benefits of being an Artist and Graphic Designer is the financial freedom that comes with it, not being limited by “salary agreed to.”

Future Plans

To open an art school around my home town Motetema, I’ve realised that not every child will be a doctor, a lawyer, not every child will be in the corporate world. There’s a young girl/boy who is an artist (writer, actor, painter, graphic designer,etc) with no guide,especially in rural settlements.

To get in touch Hola: 071 689 5215
e-mail: ausikipodi@gmail.com
facebook:Ausiki Art

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Fashion Guru makes a STATEment for himself

Having dreams of going to Paris would be the greatest dream for Refileo Dipudi better known as Refileo Guru. 24 year old young, vibrant and fashionable clothing designer Guru has big dreams for his fashion den that oozes style, elegant lifestyle and true African couture.

Guru is a true dreamer and a man that has greater vision for the fashion industry. Initially Guru studied Fine Arts and dropped out after realising that he had a “calling” to be a fashion designer. “In 2006 I decided to pursue a career in fashion designing; it was like a calling for me, a passion that had been waiting for me to grab it with both my hands.”

Like many young boys from eKasi, Guru had dreams of making it big one day. “I never knew I would be a clothing designer, I thought I would be in the arts, probably a singer or something,” he added.
Although Guru works from home, his workspace is simple yet the mind that runs behind it is one that is forever inspired with a passion for clothes and fabrics. His fabrics are elegant and the African feel is what drives this young man to the greatness he creates. “I design African contemporary clothing for woman mostly but I also occasionally design for men,” Guru said.

This young man does not just want to be a designer but a brand that stands out from all the rest. “State of Guru” is what will make him a brand as he feels that his clothing range is one of comfort, ability and elegance in its true African sense.
The Guru’s fabrics are indigenous with an incorporation of African prints. “I believe in the diversity and beauty of Africa hence a lot of my designs are Africa inclined,” he says. His inspiration comes from a few great designers yet David Tlale seems to be one of the greatest. “Tlale stands out for me as I feel that his craftsmanship showcases a lot of elegance and respect,” added Guru.


Fashion for many seems to be how many different colours one can wear and still look stylish, yet Guru says that colour blocking has become a trend even though that does not necessarily define whether one is a fashion icon or not.
“What one dresses like is ones voice. It’s the way one wants to be interpreted and how one wants to be seen as. Whether you’re in 50 colours or not,” added Guru.

“The State of Guru” seems to be on the pipeline for now but big plans are being made to ensure that his name gets out there and in your space.

“This industry is extremely competitive, however I do plan to get my brand out there.” said Guru. Plans of getting himself out there are to officially launch his clothing label in the next year. And yes Kasi Times will be there!

 

By Nonhlanhla Kobokwana

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Meet Zethu Mashika – A Star Behind the Stars

It is very refreshing to hear of someone from ekasi specialising in something different to the norm – like specialising in film scores. Okay, just so we’re on the same page, a film score is the background music composed for different scenes of a film in order to enhance the dramatic narrative and the impact of a certain scene. Zethu Mashika is one of those special, rare and interesting cases.

Achievements

WAKA StarsBorn in Benoni in the East Rand, the humble 27 year old Zethu is a music composer specialising in film scores, commercial music, title sequences and adverts. He has been part of the music industry for 8 years and continues to make an impact in the industry. He is one of South Africa’s youngest and first black composers to single-handedly score a feature film. He has written scores mostly for television and documentaries. His work includes the title sequence music for SABC 1’s Mzanzi Insider, Zwahashu, and Channel O’s Mcee Africa season one. He has composed scores for films such as Sky and Minutes to Nine, and has recently completed scoring for the forthcoming local feature film, Zama Zama. He has produced and composed for various artists such as H2O, Flabba, Zulu Mob, and Psyfo. In 2009, he produced and composed SABC 2’s election song performed by RJ Benjamin and Bongo Riot.

Music vs Expectations

It’s hard to believe that his talent is raw and untrained. His parents didn’t like the idea of him doing music. As a result, he was forced to make a quick decision to study something “solid.” After he matriculated, Zethu enrolled for an electro-mechanical engineering course at TUT. While at university, he struggled to shake off the music bug and this saw him eventually drop out during his first year to pursue his passion.

The Beginning

A friend hooked him up with artists like Flabba, H2O and Zulu Mob, for which he produced beats. His influence within the Hip Hop community was quickly recognized, but his focus was to get into the film industry. His career as producer within the music industry didn’t take off as he had wished – but he was glad it didn’t, because he believes it could’ve been harder to get into the film industry as a Hip Hop producer. He had always wanted to do film, but he thought it was almost impossible as the film industry was quite small at the time.

Growth

The first film he scored for was a short film from AFDA. This strengthened his profile and he used Read the full story

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Phakamis’ iFlag: Gunning for Gold

South African Athlete Kagisho Kumbane from a township in Bloemfontein

Kagisho Kumbane, who is taking the world by storm on the athletics track and hoisting the South African flag high, is a 23 year old athlete who grew up in a small township in Bloemfontein called Bloemanda. He started running when he was a little boy with his friends in the streets. “Back then I never used to take it seriously. I was just having fun with my friends like other kids,” says Kumbane. “Life wasn’t always easy for me, but it taught me to be tough and not to take things for granted.”

South African athlete Kagisho Kumbane from a township in BloemfoteinBackground

Kumbane started his primary school education at Monyatse Primary School, which he attended until he was in Grade 5. He then moved to what was then called a Model C school, Fauna Primary School. This school helped him nurture his talent because it had facilities schools in the townships didn’t have at the time. “I had the opportunity to relish my talent on the track and to play rugby,” he says. Kumbane then chose to attend Louis Botha Technical High School because it emphasized that students excel in both academics and on the sports field; it has also produced some of the best athletes in the country.

On the Track

“I run the 100m and 200m tracks. My fastest laps were 10:32 on the 100m track at the South African championships in 2009, where I won the bronze medal, and on the 200m track with 20:64 in 2008 at South African Student Championships, where I won the silver medal,” proudly says Kumbane.

He has run at major events across the world including the Beijing Olympics, the World Youth Championships and the All Africa Games. “Thus far, my greatest achievement in my career has been lining up on the same field as Usain Bolt in the 4 x 100m relay final at the Beijing Olympics,” says Kagisho.

Kumbane’s greatest ambition for 2012 is to compete in the in the London Olympics as an individual athlete.  He counts his grandmother, his former coach and headmaster at Louis Botha Technical High School, JC Hendricks, and his parents among the people who inspire him and have had an influence in his life.

Kagisho is currently studying and training at the University of Kentucky in the United States. He is a true example to all the peeps from ekasi that anything is possible if you work hard and stay dedicated.

– By Mbuso Mkhize

 

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Believing in Social Change

Uloosha Foundation

Nonhlanhla Makhanya was born and raised in Tembisa. She’s an IT professional and an aspiring social entrepreneur with a passion for youth development. Hence, two years ago she started a Non-Profit Organisation called Uloosha Foundation©.

Uloosha, which was started initially for the community of Tembisa, is run by the youth and is dedicated at empowering and uplifting the youth. This organisation hosts informational, empowering and human capital building events. Some of you may have heard of their Youth Arise Seminars.

“I’m obsessed with change and really believe that there’s so much the youth can do for this country. I love encouraging and motivating others to unleash and maximise their full potential,” says Makhanya.

Amongst her accomplishments, she is the vice president of the Movement for Economic Freedom South Africa (MEFSA), which comprises of young active citizens of South Africa who believe in the power of change through ACTION and IMPACT. She has been entrusted to run with an action plan on how the organisation can get the communities of Mzansi to be informed, developed and empowered to becoming great social entrepreneurs.

During her spare time she enjoys writing and is currently working towards publishing my book.

To find out more about Uloosha Foundation, you can reach Nonhlanhla Makhanya on: makhanyan@gmail.com

 

 

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Q&A with Zakwe

23-year-old rapper, Zakwe, is a young man with a steep road ahead of him. He has chosen a path that is littered with casualties. He has chosen to venture into a world that applauds shallow thought and rampant avarice. He has chosen to be a rapper!

The journey to Hip Hop stardom is a perilous one. Most get booed until they dissolve into a puddle of tears and the rest get strangled by dismal sales or pummeled by the rising cost of looking like you have money, or all of the above.

So just by jumping into this precarious world Zakwe already has his work cut out for him. But instead of just going with the swagerrous flow he has opted to swim against the tide. No frills, no funny dance-step and no lies about BMWs. What you get from a Zakwe track is a whole lot of lyrics, mountains of verses and some words sprinkled over all of it. The beat seems to be an afterthought. It’s clear where he wants your attention focused. The brother is not trying to make you dance or dream of riches. He wants you deep in thought about…um…to be honest, he lost me in the vernac.

The torrential downpour of Zulu washed my attention away instead of drawing me in. I found the verbiage to be quite cumbersome. But what do I know? I’m quite the girly-girl when it comes to Hip Hop. I like my Hip Hop well-marinated in bass, deep-fried in swag with a side order of dance. Rick Ross, Drake and J. Cole are my people. When I want to get ‘deep’ I turn to my bookshelf for the treasured company of Tolstoy, Marquez and Morrison.

Fortunately for Zakwe the number of people who suffered the same fate as me seems to be a small one. Overall, his appearance on the scene is being met with applause and respect. His single ‘Benzani’ is enjoying a generous amount of attention on radio. It even reached number one on Yfm’s Hot 99 Hip Hop countdown. He sees the role of rapper in today’s society as being, “To paint a picture in a rhyming format and be the mirror of the concept of a track.” Pretty vague, but it seems to be working for him.

Zuluboy, Pro, Proverb, Abdus, Mr. Selwyn, and AKA make the list of his favourite rappers. There is a theme running through this list. These are guys who have tried to carve out their own identity in the music scene, as opposed to regurgitating what is already being done. It’s no surprise then that his advice to young rappers is, “Don’t do what sells, sell what you do!”

That may be the key to surviving the perils of the Hip Hop world. It’s a recipe that’s working well for Zakwe. His decision to turn his back on the fluff and produce music of substance seems to be paying dividends. He kindly answered some questions for this Hip Hop Girly-Girl. Read the full story

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Thabo Moloi: Success Defined through Art

Thabo Moloi

Tell us about yourself?
I am Thabo Moloi, originally from kwaMachisiba in Pietermatrizburg. I am a freelance graphic designer and a photographer. I design logos, t-shirt, business cards, and more. And as a photographer, I enjoy pushing the boundaries of creativity. I have a passion for community development, education, and sharing knowledge. I am a radical Christian and a huge fan of Mzansi Hip Hop.

Who inspires you?
Zibusiso Mkhwanazi, founder of CrazyBoyz Digital and the AmaKipKip guys: Nkosana Modise and Siyabonga Ngwekazi. I feel they have changed the game and are now reaping the rewards of their hard work.

How do you define success?
Success is personal. Often we place benchmarks on success based on material things, such as what car you drive and where you live. However, to me, it is about doing what you love and helping others in the process. I’ve seen many people who are said to be successful but have separated themselves from their communities. Your success should open doors for others.

Samples of Thabo’s work:

    

 

  

How can potential clients reach you?
They can follow me on Twitter: @touchda8thwnda
Email td8wnda.designs@gmail.com

 

 

 

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The Man Behind KZN Hip Hop

He has been in the battle to provide a platform for Hip Hop artists in KZN for 11 years. He is the man behind the Original Material Awards, Hip Hop Ngasekhaya, Moment of Truth, and other countless annual KZN Hip Hop shows. Through these shows he puts artists on the map by providing a stage for them to market their ‘product’ to the public. He modestly denies the fact that he is taking KZN Hip Hop to greater heights; he simply sees himself as a Hip Hop fan. He mentors and inspires many in all elements of Hip Hop. He doesn’t go by an alias; his name is Ayanda Zefrino Makukule.

It is the 29 year old’s ability to pull crowds from all over KZN and gather them in one place that made him the first Hip Hop person to be sponsored by DC shoes. In 2006 he’d organised a charity show that saw 1500 people attending; the following year DC proudly started sponsoring him. His motivation comes from people. He knows how to identify a crowd’s needs and create something out of it. Next year he will be launching Queen Hip Hop, a pageant dedicated to putting the spotlight on ladies. “In all my years in hip hop I have never seen guys screaming for ladies – the ladies are always screaming for them, so I want to give the ladies a chance to shine,” he said explaining how the idea came about.

Born and bred in Clermont, a township in Durban, he is one of ‘amajita’ and admits that he was not always into hip hop. The hip hop dress code is what attracted him to it. He first noticed it when he saw guys from New Jack City playing basketball and he was hooked. From that day, he started playing basketball in and around his neighbourhood challenging other players, all the while, walking the walk and talking the talk. Women loved him because he was different from other guys and guys wanted to hang around him. “Ladies loved me – hot ladies at that! And so naturally, guys wanted to be my friends,” said Makukule in a tone that leaves a person wondering if he is joking or not. It could be his sense of humour that attracts people to him; he leaves the whole room in stitches of laughter whilst he is barely smiling. He might seem intimidating, but on the contrary, he is a friendly, funny, humble, modest and straightforward guy.

Pushing hip hop has never been about money for this qualified engineer. He is just a passionate fan who took it upon himself to help elevate his province’s hip hop level. “It all started with basketball challenges in Clermont, then someone suggested that I start rapping… so I did! I also started doing hip hop shows in my neighbourhood. Now they are spreading throughout KZN,” he said. Even though he is not that much into rapping, he raps because people always ask him to. However, when he touches the mic, only the truth comes out, no matter what language it is in. He has also featured in various mixtapes. His latest is a feature in the Gifted LP which features a number of other Durban artists.

If there is one thing he never forgets it is to pay homage. During the interview, he lists the number of people who have helped him along the way and it doesn’t bother him that some of the people he has helped don’t acknowledge him. Firstly, his gratitude goes to his parents, whom he says he can never thank enough. The desire and willingness to help people was instilled by his parents in his upbringing. It also happens to be one of the reasons why a ‘Makukule’ recording label might never be born; he does not know how to say No to people. He reckons he might end up signing the whole of KZN. Which he just might!

Here is a person KZN Hip Hop owes a big “thank you.”

Gugu Moyo

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Soweto Drift: Ikasi Livukile!

Pule EARM Drifting Towards Success

Every now and then I am blessed enough to meet individuals whose lives excite me so much so that I ignore the facts and figures of how unemployment, poverty and crime bring down this country of ours. It is people like Pule EARM Motloung, the founder of Young Minds Productions, who through their lives and passion inspire me to be much more than I am. I love meeting young black men and women from the hood who rise above the stereotypical view that township life is about dust, corrugated iron shacks, “stop nontsontso” fencing and abolova sitting in the corner doing nothing everyday.

Recently the University of Johannesburg Soweto campus successfully hosted a private screening of a film called Soweto Drift. The film was directed by one Mzansi’s most promising and gifted film directors Pule, a young man who refused to be told “You can’t” by experts, professionals and know-it-alls with years of experience in the industry. When money was an issue, when time became a factor and when critics said “No” what kept Pule going during the 3 years it took to make the film was the passion and dedication he has towards his craft. The director, father and dream chaser took the initiative to show, highlight and celebrate the silent yet noisy world of car spinning.

The film was shot in the heart of Soweto and set around realistic everyday characters we can all relate to. The movie introduces us to a young taxi driver and struggling father named Dumisani, nicknamed Damage, who is on a journey towards finding out the truth about what events led to the death of his hero and brother Mzala, who was one of the best car spinners in the hood. After being forced by a gang leader named Chairman as well as a sworn enemy named Ngamla to take part in one of the most prestigious spinning competitions of the season, we watch Damage take a drastic yet necessary turn in his character, career and life as a whole. The twists, turns and secrets are then slowly revealed and force Damage to come out of his comfort zone and become the best that he can be.

The film’s genre is in a class of its own in that it is a combination of comedy, drama and sport fused with raw talent fused from the backbone of ekasi. The film achieved everything it set out to achieve; it showcased and exposed us to unscripted, adrenalin rushing car spinning. The soundtracks were fresh and relevant to each scene, the dialogue kept audiences intrigued and entertained while at the same time schooling us about the world of burning tyres, mags, spinners, speed and BMWs. The film created a much needed awareness about spinning industry and will be released to the public in 2012. Not everyone will be able to identify with the storyline but watching it is definitely worth the thrill! It is through Pule EARM and films such as this that indeed agree and back up the famous saying “Ikasi livukile”.

Blessings,
Poppy “Pops” Vilakazi

 
Here’s an insert of Read the full story

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2 Minutes with Fashion Designer Keneilwe Mampuru

Keneilwe Mampuru (centre) with models

In 2003, Keneilwe Mampuru started her label, Keneilwe Creations, which is primarily targeted at women who are into new, quirky, but yet sophisticated things. The designs are simplistic classics, feminine, nostalgic Urban-African garments. We sat down with Keneilwe to get an understanding of what motivated her to start her own business:

Tell us about yourself. Where are you from? What’s your educational background?

My name is Keneilwe Mampuru; I am from Atteridgeville, Pretoria. I went to Pretoria High School for Girls, and then proceeded to a private design college, which was undersigned by the Tshwane University of Technology, where I studied Fashion Design. I am currently studying with the University of South Africa (UNISA). I’ve also received assistance from SEDA (Small Enterprise Development Agency) in building my business.

When did you realize you wanted to become a fashion designer?

I’ve always enjoyed sketching since I was still young. I’d draw a human figure and design some   funky clothing for it. In high school my favourite subject was Art; I thoroughly enjoyed Art History. I’ve always had an artistic streak and absolutely loved a dash of colour in everything I touched. I have 2 sisters and we were known to be “fashionable” so it was only natural that one of us became a designer. We also loved music and looked for trendy ideas from our favourite groups, like TLC and SWV in the 90s.

Where do you get your design inspiration?

From my surroundings, I’m mostly inspired by the African woman. They all have a story to tell, from the sister rocking an afro, to the more sophisticated one with a blonde weave, slender, full-figured… there’s a special element that makes a woman, a woman!

 

What are some of your accomplishments as a designer?

I had quit my job at a well known bank to follow my dream and honour my God-given talent. I’ve always known I’m an entrepreneur at heart and strived to show some of my peers that anything is possible. This year I was approached by TUT to coach the 3rd year students for their Internship programme.

What do you like best about South Africa’s fashion industry?

I like that we have a rich culture and are not at all shy to embrace it. We are highly spirited people and it shows in most of our designers’ work, which gives the SA Fashion industry that unique element. I also like that we are not afraid to express ourselves through colour.

How would you define your personal style?

It’s very comfortable and simple, yet quirky. I’m very reserved so my clothing style resembles that. I have my own style and choose clothing that accentuates my body shape and size. I love accessories and have a fetish for earrings; I like that they can hide those ‘dull days.’

What advice do you have for aspiring fashion designers?

To know that fashion is not only about being fashionable and knowing the latest trends. There’s more to it, like merging creativity and professionalism. Education doesn’t have an ending; they should always strive to learn new things, not necessarily related to the Fashion Industry.Reading in itself opens their minds and broadens their perspective. I would also advise them to travel, see how other continents do things. The possibilities are endless.

Keneilwe is based in Attridgeville, Pretoria. Keneilwe Kreations has a page on Facebook and a Twitter account. Her blog (http://keneilwekreations.wordpress.com) informs clients of their latest offering, developments and trends.

Contact details:  Keneilwe Mampuru (Founder & Head Designer)

Email Address: kmampuru@keneilwekreations.com

Telephone number: (012) 373 0572

 

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Ekasi Through the Lens – Photographic Journey

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, and for Lebogang Lekwae, better known as Azania Lab Tafari, telling stories through the good eye of a camera lens is a way for him to communicate with the universe and share stories that affect society.

His passion for photography started out when his father used to take him with to weddings and community events to take pictures. Starting off, Lebogang wasn’t so keen on taking pictures but saw it as an opportunity to earn extra pocket money and he took over from his father. He soon realised that there was a lot more he could do with a camera. His works on social documentary started out eKasi in Vosloorus where he captured pictures that showed another side to the township. He took pictures that were thought-provoking, showing the day to day lives of people from informal settlements that surround the township.

Lebogang’s work is influenced by his love for people and conversing with them to find out how they keep up with conditions they live under.

Lebogang’s first exhibition was alongside South Africa’s living legend in photography Mr. Alph Khumalo, the man behind the famous pictures on the historic event of the Soweto uprising in 1976. The exhibition, based at Roots Gallery in Soweto, captured the modern day scholar. The response was great. Lebogang is now currently studying at the Market Photo Workshop in Newtown, Johannesburg. He vows that he will soon be running his own photo studio, where people will be able get pieces of his work on request.

Lebogang would like to freelance with mainstream newspapers and magazines. He also promises that there’s a lot to look out for in the near future from the Azania Lab Photography. Here are a few pieces of his work:

  

 

You can check out more of his work on Flicker.com or FaceBook: Azania Photo Lab

Nobaba signing out!

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Phakamis’ iFlag: Blue Collar Households Raise White Collar Mansions!

Phakamis’ Iflag is a platform to praise the positive in the hood, to celebrate the people that make it the beautiful place that it is, and to constantly challenge the powers that be, to make it a safe and enjoyable environment for all who live in it.

This article is dedicated to all the sons and daughters of the soil that make it such a life altering experience to grow up and be successful ekasi. To be born into the organised chaos that the township is, goes a mile and a few in building strong characters and personalities that make up today’s leaders of industry, inspiring artists and spearheads of our beloved country. From a majority of blue collar households where parents kicked the dusty streets of the township in the early morning to earn their keep, to the kitchen party societies and MChina gambling circuits that have put many through school, the people of ekasi have always been financially innovative and determined to make life worth living for their families.

So here’s to the brave, that police our dangerous streets;

To the mothers that have single-handedly kept households on their feet;

The men who are ever-present fathers to their children, no matter how hard the situation.

Here’s to those that inspire others to be great, and make it their responsibility to empower the hopeful young minds in the township;

The teachers that give much-needed knowledge to young minds and build the foundation needed to progress; Read the full story

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Thesis Concept Store Spring/Summer Range

Mangaliso Mbitshana and Wandile Zondo are the innovative minds behind Thesis, a creative powerhouse tailored towards a lifestyle theme in the form of a concept store. The brand recently released their Spring/Summer collection made up of t-shirts, jeans, dresses, jackets, hats, bags, skirts, sunglasses and jewelry. The collection is very edgy, funky, playful and colorful, with the use of bright colors like blue, green orange and white. The pair kept it fresh, unique yet comfortable and very wearable:

   

   

Check the Thesis Concept Store out on:

173 Machaba Street, Mtetwa Centre, Mofolo Village, Soweto
Tel: (011) 982 1182

 

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